Petition to Joel Robideaux
Remove Lafayette’s Confederate Gen. Mouton Statue

Remove Lafayette’s Confederate Gen. Mouton Statue
Lafayette Parish, LA, US

Monuments to the lost cause of slavery remain around our country. In Lafayette, a diverse community, a monument to a slave owner general remains as a reminder to minorities of white supremacy.

From KATC:

“The General Mouton statue has been the scene of several protests and rallies calling on the city to remove the Confederate-era monument. Earlier this year, Move the Mindset, a local organization dedicated to removing these types of statues, gathered in Downtown Lafayette to rally for its removal. Read that story, here.

The monument to General Alfred Mouton was erected by the Daughters of the Confederacy in 1922.” (Source)

The statue must go for the good of all citizens. Please let Joel Robideaux and the Parish-City Council know how you feel.

 

August 28, 2018
Letter to
Mayor-President, Joel Robideaux
Remove Lafayette’s Confederate Gen. Mouton Statue

Updates

admin start this petition
6 months ago

35 Comments

Angie Broussard
Angie Broussard

I stand with everyone who is offended and hurt by this and constantly reminded that those who fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War were fighting to keep black Americans oppressed. Lafayette needs to live up to its identity as the little city that hosts one of the largest International festivals in the world. I just hate that visitors see the statue.

Fay Bowen
Fay Bowen

We should not continue to revere the hateful feelings, this statue represents. If we are ever to be “One Acadiana,” and “Lafayette Strong,” we need to recognize the sins of the past, and do better!

Georgia Gates
Georgia Gates

I think the General Mouton statue should be moved to a more appropriate place like a museum.

Patricia Zahrbock
Patricia Zahrbock

Although we need to remember and learn from our history, we do not need to honor the shameful, dark parts with a statue.

Aimee Robinson
Aimee Robinson

The statue is a painful reminder of a terrible time in our history, on public land. It is past time to move it to an appropriate place.

Lynette Mejia
Lynette Mejia

I believe it’s long past time to move forward in Lafayette. These monuments have no place in our racially diverse, culturally rich city.

David Levy
David Levy

The statue represents oppression of black people.

loree stickles
loree stickles

i dont believe we need to continue to celebrate slave owners

Mark Henderson
Mark Henderson

I am against the whitewashing of history exercised to satisfy the feelings of the losing side.

Carolyn Goudelocke
Carolyn Goudelocke

After learning the history behind the installation of these statues, I fully support their removal from public spaces.
My hope is to see Lafayette become ever more progressive, both economically and socially.

Jessica Edwards
Jessica Edwards

I am signing because monuments erected to honor slave owners and/or those that fought for the right to own human beings is inexcusable. I am NOT signing to change history, but rather, who, from history, we choose to honor. – Thank you.

Fred Prejean
Fred Prejean

The Lafayette Administration and Parish Council have the responsibility to ensure a quality of life that is non-discriminatory and non- intimidating to all citizens. The statue is a relic of a past era and should be moved to a location of appropriate context where it’s true meaning can be understood. It is not a symbol of pride nor honor. It was erected by The United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1922 as a symbol of white supremacy and perpetual domination of descendants of slaves.

Patricia Sidman
Patricia Sidman

This statue was erected more than 50 years after the end of the Confederacy. Its purpose was, and remains, to assert white supremacy, and that brings pain to a large number of Lafayette citizens. Out of respect for all our citizens, this statue must be moved off of public land.

Joe Riehl
Joe Riehl

Lafayette history is longer and much more varied than the Civil War. Our people are much more diverse than soldiers and generals. A memorial to one small part of our population and one small segment of time is inappropriate and non-representative of our welcoming and visionary city. And for that memorial to have such a prominent place surely presents us all in an inaccurate light. The Mouton statue’s rightful place is near the Lafayette Museum, the ancestral Mouton home.

Barbara St. Romain
Barbara St. Romain

The statue reflects the deplorable implications of slavery, Jim Crow laws and white supremacy which it is beyond time for our Lafayette community to leave in the past.

Kathy Attwood
Kathy Attwood

This statue needs to be removed. Our community cannot progress with symbols of White Supremacy.

M. Christian Green
M. Christian Green

My ancestors were involved in white supremacy in the 19th century and it has been quite a historical burden to bear. I think the statue should be relocated to a place where it can be used to teach the reality of white supremacy and Jim Crow, preferably a local civil rights museum to be established for that purpose. I further believe that the statue violates the U.S. Constitution’s 14th Amendment guarantee of equal protection of the laws, by communicating a message of racial hatred on public land, in front of the former City Hall, a building still clearly labeled as such. This message, directed at nearby communities of color is clearly indicated by documentary evidence from the time it was erected. A competition should be held to find a local artist to commission a replacement work of public art that expresses values of EQUALITY, DIGNITY, AND CIVIL/HUMAN RIGHTS. It is time to tell a new, better, and progressive story about Lafayette.

Aimee Dominique
Aimee Dominique

This statue is a symbol of Jim Crow Era and white supremacy. It must be moved!

Dr. Istvan S. N. Berkeley
Dr. Istvan S. N. Berkeley

I hate living in a town where racist ideology is displayed in a public space. You have no idea how many times I have to have had to make excuses for this monstrosity.

Michael Scott Ferguson
Michael Scott Ferguson

The monument was erected in 1922 during the height of the Jim Crow era. It attempts to glorify a time of legalized slavery which history has shown deserves no glory.

Lenora Meaux
Lenora Meaux

The Mouton statue is a symbol of slavery, oppression, and racism. It should have never been erected in the first place. Take it down!

Tricia Templet
Tricia Templet

This statue and all others like it are painful reminders of the atrocities committed by the slave owners of bygone eras. These statues would be akin to Germany maintaining statues of Hitler, or Italy of Mussolini. We should not memorialize individuals who harmed, maimed and kept people as property. Furthermore, we should also not memorialize leaders of an enemy party, as the confederacy was at the time an enemy of the United States of America.

Jeremy chittenden
Jeremy chittenden

This statue holds no historical significance for this area. It’s a demarcation of past atrocities of this nation and is not a proper representation of history. If anything it’s a participation trophy for hatred on display in our city. It needs to be taken down.

Keith Dorwick
Keith Dorwick

It is time for Louisiana and Lafayette in particular to publically reject its adherence to racism by celebrating a war hero for a war that was fought to defend and preserve slavery, a shameful and degrading violation of human rights.

Russell LeJeune
Russell LeJeune

Monuments of participants in historic war events belong at museums not government office buildings.

Rachel A. Foreman
Rachel A. Foreman

It is time to move forward. These tributes to white supremacy have no place here now.

Linda Cart
Linda Cart

I would like to see the statue moved off of public property to a historical place of context, such as a museum. The statue is offensive to our diverse community as it glorifies the men who supported the system of slavery in our country and city.

Pamela Sharp
Pamela Sharp

This statue belongs in a museum.

Mary Kelley Richard
Mary Kelley Richard

Because I believe it is our duty to dismantle white supremacy wherever we find it. The statue is one part of reaching that goal.

Maribel Dietz
Maribel Dietz

The statue was erected in a spirit of hate and racism—- it does not represent who we are as a city.

Shari Hinkel
Shari Hinkel

It is important to remember our past, but it is harmful to treat those who demeaned and harmed Americans as ‘heroes’. Create a place for monuments like these so we never forget the darkness of our past. Put in place monuments of hope, those who stood up for equality and those who strived to make us a better people.

Marja Lyn Broussard
Marja Lyn Broussard

At the tender age of 57 today, I remember as a young child, while walking by the white supremacy statue in downtown Lafayette, La., hand in hand with my mom. I remember asking her, “who’s that?” She never answered who it is, she simply and quietly said “don’t look at it”, “you don’t need to know that”. I asked her time again and time again, always getting the same reply. So eventually, I stop asking and I never gave it much thought. I also remember passing my mom’s message to a cousin or two when we were teenagers, walking by it. If this statue was something of great pride for the citizens of our city, why would my mom not tell me who the statue is? Why would she insist I didn’t need to know? I’m thinking she didn’t want me to be afraid, or maybe it was painful, one thing for certain she knew who the statue is. When I learned the statue is General Alfred Mouton, a slave owner, a person who gave his life fighting to keep slavery and white supremacy alive and well, I WAS JUST DISGUSTED!! Slaves received the harshest and the absolutely most in humane treatment of a human being know to any man throughout our entire history in this world!! The White Supremacist statue sits on a pedestal, over looking downtown Lafayette (how embarrassing ?) does not represent ME and about 45% of the residents of Lafayette. I recently learned the property was once owned by a black person (how disrespectful ?) Let me ask this question: If someone were to beat, rape and / or kill your wives and daughters, beat your sons to within inches of death, hung your brothers, nieces, and nephews in a tree until their bodies hung lifeless, if that somebody would have burn any your family members alive, would you be ok with the statue of that somebody on the front lawn of your home? If the statue of that someone is standing where the Mouton statue is today, would you be ok with the statue being there? I’d like to believe your reply is “OF COURSE NOT!”, “ABSOLUTELY NOT!” I’m sure you’d say, “TAKE IT DOWN!!” Well, I am saying the same, TAKE IT DOWN!!!

Harry lee jolivette
Harry lee jolivette

He need to go To another place

Cheryl Phillips
Cheryl Phillips

As a frequent visitor to Lafayette, I fully support the removal of the statue of Gen. Mouton. This statue represents oppression, slavery, and treason and should not be given a place of honor in the city. It should be moved to a museum as a learrning tool or reside in the cemetary that houses Mouton’s remains

Rhonda R. Berkeley
Rhonda R. Berkeley

I am opposed to any symbol whose associations include hatred and racial prejudice, and the Mouton statue, as a symbol of what Lafayette represents, does exactly that.

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42 Supporters

58 needed to reach 100